Chef Cooper’s Whisky-rubbed Cured Salmon in Orange, VA

After writing my previous post about Virginia-made single malt whisky from the Copper Fox Distillery,  I thought I’d continue the Virginia spirits topic with a recipe.  I consulted one our region’s finest chefs, Randy Cooper, from Elmwood at Sparks.  Elmwood at Sparks is one of several outstanding fine dining restaurants in our region, but it is the only one of its kind right here on Main Street in Orange, VA, just a block away from our Virginia Bed and Breakfast! Our guests thoroughly enjoy Elmwood at Sparks. We have never recieved a negative review, and Chef Cooper puts his extensive experience with French and American style cuisines to good use. We recieve the best comments about the delectable sauces and scrumptious soups Chef Cooper crafts. Since I have been exploring the many options for Virginia-produced whisky and other spirits, I asked Chef Cooper to recommend a recipe using whisky as an ingredient. The recipe below is what he provided, and I can’t wait to try it!  Please try it yourselves, and tell me what you think! “Whiskey Rubbed Cured Salmon”  2# Fresh Salmon 375 ML Your favorite Whiskey 4 oz ginger- sliced 2 sprigs rosemary 2 sprigs thyme 3# salt 3# Sugar 1T black peppercorns Cheesecloth as needed Combine in sauce pot over high heat : whiskey, thyme, rosemary, half of peppercorns,  and ginger. Reduce by half- CAUTION- this may flame (remove from heat and allow to reduce over lower heat)- allow to cool. Wrap salmon in cheesecloth and place in a deep baking dish. Pour ingredients over cheesecloth-wrapped salmon  and allow to marinade for up to 24 hours. Combine salt,...

Rachel Ray has no Idea What She is Talking About…

Rachel Ray Has No Idea What She’s Talking About or How to Cook Perfect Bacon  Except for Rachel Ray, you generally won’t find celebrity chefs expounding on the nuances of good bacon-frying technique. In fact, many folks probably remember learning how to cook bacon about the same time they learned how to boil water. Remove the battery from the smoke detector, heat up a pan, throw on the bacon, and keep flipping it until it is cooked. How hard could it be? As a four-year veteran innkeeper of a busy bed and breakfast in Virginia, I can tell you that the line between a perfectly cooked strip of breakfast heaven and a sun-dried leather bootstrap crusted with creosote is not as wide as one might hope. Nothing will disappoint a bed and breakfast guest faster than pork in the form of a soggy, undercooked chewing-gum strip or a charcoal briquette flattened into a shape that vaguely resembles a meat product. Perfect bacon makes a perfect breakfast.  A good innkeeper simply must know how to cook bacon. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. Although I do not claim to be able to go toe-to-toe with Rachel Ray in a Food Network Cage Match (if such a thing existed—and, if it did, it would make the Food Network much more interesting), I respectfully submit that on the subject of cooking bacon, she should leave the instruction to the experts. For true “baconistas,” this article will describe how to cook perfect bacon. My grandfather was a carpenter and he understood that success at one’s craft requires the proper tools and the proper...