Orange’s Edible Food Fest: “Celebrating Food From Earth To Table” on August 9th

At last year’s Edible Food Fest I discovered that I love goat cheese. Previously I’d been unimpressed (and rather revolted, frankly) by the grocery-store variety, so I was initially dubious about trying it. Still, you can’t claim to love cheese without being willing to sample every variety, so I reached for a Romano-laden toothpick and gingerly nibbled off the edge. And, that quickly, I was hooked. There was just something special about it. Maybe it was the simple, straightforward way it was presented, or maybe it was just that it was amazing, flavorful hard cheese, straight from the brine. Regardless, it was mouthwateringly good: strong, salty, and pungent. Needless to say, I took home a package—and a business card, so I could reorder. This seems to be a common experience of many who have flocked to the Edible Food Fest during the past two years. Whether it’s a homemade granola, a locally made cider, or a line of jams and jellies, most people find something new and exciting they want to take home and talk about. Also extremely popular are the chef demonstration tents (they’ve added a second one this year!) which late-comers find to be standing-room-only. The fest is a great chance to meet fellow foodies and get a hands-on look at some of the best local, organic, and homemade offerings the area is producing. Among the vendors this year: Plantation Peanuts of Wakefield, Bees n’ Blossoms (raw honey), Croftburn Market (meats), Spring Mill Farm (goat cheese), Wildwood’s Hickory Syrup, and Family Ties and Pies. Located within walking distance of the festival, the Holladay House is the perfect...
The smell of homemade biscuits . . .

The smell of homemade biscuits . . .

Made-from-Scratch Buttermilk Biscuit Recipe from Orange, VA When we bought the Holladay House Bed and Breakfast in Orange, VA, the Holladay family bestowed upon us the secret of their success: their family buttermilk biscuit recipe! The Holladay family owned our home for over a century, from 1899 to 2000.  In 1989, Pete Holladay (the grandson of Dr. Lewis Holladay) and his wife Phebe (yes, that is spelled correctly), turned his family’s Main Street historic home into a Virginia Bed and Breakfast.  In a small historic town like Orange, Virginia, an innkeeper simply has no “street cred” unless they are capable of producing the best-tasting biscuits around.  So, Pete kept his family’s buttermilk biscuit recipe alive, and these biscuits probably have been made in this house as long as his family owned it. We are happy to keep the tradition alive, and our guests are glad we are!  Sharon has delighted many out-of-town guest as well as Orange, Virginia locals by learning this historic buttermilk biscuit recipe. While I get a chance to sleep in a little, she gets up early to bake these buttermilk biscuits fresh for our guests. As I said in my post on how to cook bacon, one should seek instruction from the masters of previous generations.  For your breakfast-eating pleasure, we are passing this recipe along to you.  And for a tutorial on how to make these tasty treats, view Sharon’s YouTube video. Enjoy! Holladay Family Buttermilk Biscuits from Orange, VA Ingredients: 2 cups all purpose flour 1 T baking powder 2 teaspoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 stick...

Chef Cooper’s Whisky-rubbed Cured Salmon in Orange, VA

After writing my previous post about Virginia-made single malt whisky from the Copper Fox Distillery,  I thought I’d continue the Virginia spirits topic with a recipe.  I consulted one our region’s finest chefs, Randy Cooper, from Elmwood at Sparks.  Elmwood at Sparks is one of several outstanding fine dining restaurants in our region, but it is the only one of its kind right here on Main Street in Orange, VA, just a block away from our Virginia Bed and Breakfast! Our guests thoroughly enjoy Elmwood at Sparks. We have never recieved a negative review, and Chef Cooper puts his extensive experience with French and American style cuisines to good use. We recieve the best comments about the delectable sauces and scrumptious soups Chef Cooper crafts. Since I have been exploring the many options for Virginia-produced whisky and other spirits, I asked Chef Cooper to recommend a recipe using whisky as an ingredient. The recipe below is what he provided, and I can’t wait to try it!  Please try it yourselves, and tell me what you think! “Whiskey Rubbed Cured Salmon”  2# Fresh Salmon 375 ML Your favorite Whiskey 4 oz ginger- sliced 2 sprigs rosemary 2 sprigs thyme 3# salt 3# Sugar 1T black peppercorns Cheesecloth as needed Combine in sauce pot over high heat : whiskey, thyme, rosemary, half of peppercorns,  and ginger. Reduce by half- CAUTION- this may flame (remove from heat and allow to reduce over lower heat)- allow to cool. Wrap salmon in cheesecloth and place in a deep baking dish. Pour ingredients over cheesecloth-wrapped salmon  and allow to marinade for up to 24 hours. Combine salt,...
Rachel Ray has no Idea What She is Talking About…

Rachel Ray has no Idea What She is Talking About…

Rachel Ray Has No Idea What She’s Talking About or How to Cook Perfect Bacon Except for Rachel Ray, you generally won’t find celebrity chefs expounding on the nuances of good bacon-frying technique. In fact, many folks probably remember learning how to cook bacon about the same time they learned how to boil water. Remove the battery from the smoke detector, heat up a pan, throw on the bacon, and keep flipping it until it is cooked. How hard could it be? As a four-year veteran innkeeper of a busy bed and breakfast in Virginia, I can tell you that the line between a perfectly cooked strip of breakfast heaven and a sun-dried leather bootstrap crusted with creosote is not as wide as one might hope. Nothing will disappoint a bed and breakfast guest faster than pork in the form of a soggy, undercooked chewing-gum strip or a charcoal briquette flattened into a shape that vaguely resembles a meat product. Perfect bacon makes a perfect breakfast.  A good innkeeper simply must know how to cook bacon. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. Although I do not claim to be able to go toe-to-toe with Rachel Ray in a Food Network Cage Match (if such a thing existed—and, if it did, it would make the Food Network much more interesting), I respectfully submit that on the subject of cooking bacon, she should leave the instruction to the experts. For true “baconistas,” this article will describe how to cook perfect bacon.  Equipment To reach bacon Nirvana, you will first need to acquire a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet that is large enough to...