Summer Fun To-Do List

Immerse yourself in history at the Holladay House. Built in 1830, the House contributed to local Civil War History by playing a pivotal role for both the North and South side. Events such as an 1862 open war and the wedding reception of an officer in Robert E. Lee’s army occurred at the inn. As you enjoy this stunning historic bed and breakfast, don’t miss out on these four amazing locations: Four Country Players (Barboursville, Virginia) Staying at Holladay House allows you to be minutes from the longest operating community theater in Central Virginia. Experience over forty years of masterful musicals, hilarious comedies, and thought provoking dramas such as Chicago, Bullet for an Unaccompanied Heart, Dancing with Myself and many more to keep you entertained all evening long. Early Mountain Vineyard (Madison, Virginia) A getaway is incomplete without visiting one of Virginia’s award winning wineries. Early Mountain is particularly special since Lt. Joseph Early agreed to house a weary traveler. Little did he know it would be General George Washington. The views of the Blue Ridge Mountains are as soothing and breathtaking as ever, and the locally-sourced food paired with the wines is not to be missed. Shabby Love Visit this cute one-of-a-kind shop selling upcycled, vintage, handmade furniture. It’s amazing how Hannah, the owner, can bring new life to and old beaten-down throw-away item. Don’t end your getaway empty handed: decorate your home with a beautiful and practical souvenir that will have you recalling this amazing weekend. Skydive Orange This is one to check off the bucket list! Nothing defines thrill better than skydiving. If you like, before...

New Year’s Resolutions….

I think it goes without saying what New Year’s Resolution #1 was this year (as usual). If you need a hint, linger in the checkout line of your local grocery store for about five or six seconds. The magazine racks and book displays have rectified their philandering ways from over the holidays (evidenced by cutesy cookies sprinkled with colored sugar, six-layer coconut cakes, and beautifully decadent chocolate cream pies.) Now reformed and back on moral high ground, these same magazines are now promoting (with grins bent into grim, determined cheerfulness) how to make all the joyous calories you inhaled over the past month “just go away”. OK. So, like the rest of us, you’ve avowed to lose weight/get in shape. In which case, you need to make it interesting–make it count for something more worthwhile and life-affirming than merely how bikini-ready your buns are by Beach Week. When you’re ninety, looking back at your life from a creaky pinnacle that stretches for miles in hindsight, you’ll realize there are better memories to be made than huffing and puffing along with a workout video. Here are a few ideas, all located an easy drive from the Holladay House. #1: Hike Old Rag This is a multi-terrain trail that will challenge your stamina, your mountain-goat moves, and your view of the world at once. Not for novices nor for the faint of heart (as the saying goes) though I once hiked it while possessed of both unfortunate accoutrements. Prep your hike with tips and helpful info here. #2: Play Paintball I think anyone who’s ever watched a war movie (or the...
Virginia’s Largest Corn Maze

Virginia’s Largest Corn Maze

“Don’t run, and don’t leave the paths.” The Liberty Mills Farm employee told us, giving us the scoop before we began our foray into the corn maze. “And whatever you do, don’t swear in the maze. There are 2 million undeveloped ears out there, so we can’t tolerate that.” There was a pause, and we chuckled as we got the “corny” humor. Then I addressed a smallish concern of my own. “If we’re not, um, back by dark–?” I began, staring down at the complex network of lines crisscrossing our map. He grinned. “We’ll come find you before we close up for the night. Don’t worry, no one’s ever gotten lost for good.” Somewhat reassured, we flashed thumbs-up and set off to conquer, armed with our color-coded map and–well, pretty much just our color-coded map. And that’s part of what’s fun about it–you feel like you’re setting out into the unknown, having an adventure with a treasure map, while still retaining the comforting knowledge that sooner or later you’ll find your way out again. My husband and I opted for the blue maze first. It’s billed as the “secondary” maze (1 hour) for those a little above the “elementary” yellow level (30 minutes) but not quite ready for the red “bachelors” (2-3 hours). We didn’t even consider entering the green “masters” level, which seems to require intuition as the only navigational tool and isn’t featured on the map. The map was, by the way, incredibly accurate, which made negotiating the ship-and-waves design of the blue maze a bit simpler. Our assigned task en route was to find 13 American...
Gordonsville Ghostbusters

Gordonsville Ghostbusters

For those of you looking to put your Halloween celebration on steroids (or just enjoy the spine-tingling effects of the Unexplained) you’ll want to take note. Gordonsville’s Exchange Hotel is billed, according to A&E “History Channel”, as #15 on their “TOP 100 Most Haunted Places in the Country”. This comes as no surprise, considering the building once functioned as a receiving hospital for wounded Civil War soldiers. According to the records, the hospital treated up to 70,000 soldiers during the war, and, temporarily, had around 700 of them buried there. In their backyard. For those looking to scare up some spooks themselves (or debunk the rumors), there’s the “Night @ the Museum” tour, which, according to the website, allows you to answer for yourself the question “…what happens after the museum closes, everyone goes home and darkness falls?” Check it out—http://nighttouratexchangehotel.weebly.com/ However, I have no particular hankering to dabble in the realm of Creepy (or to provoke my overactive imagination), so my husband and I opted for a more conventional approach and visited the Exchange Hotel during daytime hours, 10AM-4PM. The museum is broken into a few segments to represent various aspects of the building’s diverse life, but overall flows well and makes sense. The bottom floor contains a reproduction of the original hotel tavern–and humorous details about the “whistle walk”. The Gordonsville train depot artifacts are currently housed here as well, so you can explore train travel in the 1800s (an integral part of the hotel’s history), the origins of the name “Exchange Hotel”, and the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad mascot kitty, “Chessie”. The middle floor is primarily a...
The Library of Congress: Packard Campus

The Library of Congress: Packard Campus

The exterior of the Library of Congress Packard Campus is pretty cool–lots of concrete and glass overgrown with vines, with a round reflective pool in the courtyard area. Despite what’s housed inside, the outside wouldn’t feel particularly out of place if it were featured on the History Channel’s “Life After People.” However, it’s best to admire it in photos, as my husband and I learned when we visited a week or two ago. The lesson we can now impart is as follows: just because the building is cool doesn’t mean you should walk around it. Just because you’re curious doesn’t mean you should walk around it. Just because there’s no sign that says you shouldn’t walk around it doesn’t mean you should walk around it. Architectural curiosity (and a talking-to from Security) aside, here’s a little background on the who, what, where. According to their website, http://www.loc.gov/avconservation/packard/,this peculiar, slightly mysterious building-on-a-hill holds and houses the heftiest audio-visual collection in the world. That apparently amounts to 6,000,000+ moving images and audio recordings. To manage all of that media content, they have 35 climate-controlled vaults, and about 90 miles of shelving. (My husband and I have a combined book collection that sometimes seems to occupy only slightly less space. *Sigh*.) In addition to storing the best movies ever made, Packard Campus screens (at no charge, first-come-first-serve) a few selections each week in their 205 seat, Art-Deco theater. This month began with a celebration of the life of Robin Williams (“Good Morning, Vietnam”, “Aladdin”, and “Mrs.Doubtfire”, among other favorites). As the month progresses, the marquee will feature a number of popular sci-fi flicks and...
“Shrek: The Musical” at 4 County Players

“Shrek: The Musical” at 4 County Players

The new show playing out at 4 County Players encourages you to “let your freak flag fly”. “Shrek: The Musical” opened July 18 and was quickly sold out for opening night. My hubby and I were able to procure tickets for the July 26th performance (is that the most romantic anniversary gift ever, or what?) 4 County Players is located in Barboursville, VA–only about 15 minutes away from Holladay House, down Rt.20. We made the drive just in time to claim our seats, which were perfect: midway back, and right in the center. Then again, there aren’t any bad seats in the house. The theater is larger than it looks from the outside, but small enough that even the back row doesn’t miss a word (or a note from the live orchestra). The show was, as always at 4CP, well-acted, well-directed, and accentuated with beautiful costumes and backdrops. We thoroughly enjoyed the performance—particularly “Donkey”, who was spot-on. During intermission we enjoyed drinks and snacks from the 4CP’s very own Bistro, though there’s a more complete dining venue available. Stonefire Kitchen, located just across the road, stays open until 8PM on show nights to provide theater-goers with a great gourmet deli experience. You can find their menu, photos, and info about the owners and chefs here: http://stonefirestation.com/ Sadly, by the time this post was ready to go live, “Shrek” was entirely sold out for the remainder of its run—a testimony to the quality and popularity of 4 County Players’ productions. Still, they have a great season coming up, and lots to see. Upcoming shows on the Mainstage include “Little Women”...