A Brief Introduction

Our readers may have noticed that a new writer has recently begun contributing to our blog! Kimberly Barr has been a valuable asset at the Holladay House for years. She knows our operations “inn” and out, and she is a native of Orange County. She has plenty of personal interests that dovetail nicely with the Holladay House and all the fun things to do in the Virginia Piedmont region: cooking, traveling, hiking, photography, history, theater, and the arts. These interests, plus her sharp wit and natural passion for writing make her the ideal person to write about all the things that make our historic inn and the Orange County and Charlottesville areas a great place to visit! So, please check in with us as often as you can to see what Kim is writing about! Also, leave her a comment or two to give her some encouragement, or to request an article on a topic of interest to you! –...

The smell of homemade biscuits . . .

Made-from-Scratch Buttermilk Biscuit Recipe from Orange, VA When we bought the Holladay House Bed and Breakfast in Orange, VA, the Holladay family bestowed upon us the secret of their success: their family buttermilk biscuit recipe!  The Holladay family owned our home for over a century, from 1899 to 2000.  In 1989, Pete Holladay (the grandson of Dr. Lewis Holladay) and his wife Phebe (yes, that is spelled correctly), turned his family’s Main Street historic home into a Virginia Bed and Breakfast.  In a small historic town like Orange, Virginia, an innkeeper simply has no “street cred” unless they are capable of producing the best-tasting biscuits around.  So, Pete kept his family’s buttermilk biscuit recipe alive, and these biscuits probably have been made in this house as long as his family owned it. We are happy to keep the tradition alive, and our guests are glad we are!  Sharon has delighted many out-of-town guest as well as Orange, Virginia locals by learning this historic buttermilk biscuit recipe. While I get a chance to sleep in a little, she gets up early to bake these buttermilk biscuits fresh for our guests. As I said in my post on how to cook bacon, one should seek instruction from the masters of previous generations.  For your breakfast-eating pleasure, we are passing this recipe along to you.  Enjoy! Holladay Family Buttermilk Biscuits from Orange, VA Ingredients: 2 cups all purpose flour 1 T baking powder 2 teaspoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1/8 teaspoon salt 1 stick of butter chilled, plus 1 T butter, melted 3/4 cup buttermilk Directions: 1. Preheat oven...

A Game of Chess at James Madison’s Montpelier

I used to joust with my college room-mate over a game of chess.  We played for different reasons. For him, it was an intellectual challenge of strategy, an opportunity to demonstrate how victory (and bragging rights) could be secured through reason and endurance. For me, it was a chance to unwind and thwart the foundations of reason by asserting the supremancy of whimsy, blind luck, and psychology.  My opponent’s turns usually lasted 20 minutes or more.  Mine typically took about 2 minutes, and their completion usually invited a raised eyebrow of annoyance and disbelief from my compatriot. More often than not, deliberation and reason prevailed, and I lost more than one pitcher of beer for my insolence. To the victor went the spoils . I had forgotten about these semi-frequent sparring matches until recent events at James Madison’s Montpelier conjured them from my mind. You see, James Madison was an avid chess player, and he frequently sparred with his friend Thomas Jefferson.  Madison and Jefferson were both intellectual powerhouses–Madison was deeply learned and bookish, while Jefferson was more focused on breadth and application.  A chess match between these two was undoubtedly a serious affair. Around 1853, Jefferson’s granddaughter, Ellen Wayles Coolidge, wrote the following about her grand father:  “So he was, in his youth, a very good chess-player. There were not among his associates, many who could get the better of him. I have heard him speak of ‘four hour games’ with Mr. Madison. Yet I have heard him say that when, on his arrival in Paris, he was introduced into a Chess Club, he was beaten at once,...

Chef Cooper’s Whisky-rubbed Cured Salmon in Orange, VA

After writing my previous post about Virginia-made single malt whisky from the Copper Fox Distillery,  I thought I’d continue the Virginia spirits topic with a recipe.  I consulted one our region’s finest chefs, Randy Cooper, from Elmwood at Sparks.  Elmwood at Sparks is one of several outstanding fine dining restaurants in our region, but it is the only one of its kind right here on Main Street in Orange, VA, just a block away from our Virginia Bed and Breakfast! Our guests thoroughly enjoy Elmwood at Sparks. We have never recieved a negative review, and Chef Cooper puts his extensive experience with French and American style cuisines to good use. We recieve the best comments about the delectable sauces and scrumptious soups Chef Cooper crafts. Since I have been exploring the many options for Virginia-produced whisky and other spirits, I asked Chef Cooper to recommend a recipe using whisky as an ingredient. The recipe below is what he provided, and I can’t wait to try it!  Please try it yourselves, and tell me what you think! “Whiskey Rubbed Cured Salmon”  2# Fresh Salmon 375 ML Your favorite Whiskey 4 oz ginger- sliced 2 sprigs rosemary 2 sprigs thyme 3# salt 3# Sugar 1T black peppercorns Cheesecloth as needed Combine in sauce pot over high heat : whiskey, thyme, rosemary, half of peppercorns,  and ginger. Reduce by half- CAUTION- this may flame (remove from heat and allow to reduce over lower heat)- allow to cool. Wrap salmon in cheesecloth and place in a deep baking dish. Pour ingredients over cheesecloth-wrapped salmon  and allow to marinade for up to 24 hours. Combine salt,...

Single Malt Whisky Comes from Scotland—or Does It?

Be prepared, dear readers, for this is my “coming out” day.  I’m a whisky man.  There– I said it. Out loud and in the heart of genteel Virginia Wine Country.  This may come as a shock to Virginia Wine enthusiasts who have come to know our Bed and Breakfast in Orange, VA as a place that exclusively serves fine Virginia Wine from local wineries, such as Barboursville, Keswick, Old House, Prince Michel, Gray Ghost, and quite a few others.  We’ve held Virginia wine tasting events, hosted receptions with Virginia wine, offered tours to Virginia wineries, tasted hundreds of Virginia wines ourselves, and generally do all we can to promote Virginia Wine, especially those crafted on the Journey Through Hallowed Ground and the Monticello Wine Trail.  But I prefer whisky. I’m sorry, I just do. Don’t hate me because I like spirits.  In my formative years of alcohol consumption, a man of dubious character said to me: “If you’re going to drink, drink like a man.”  He then handed me a bottle of George Dickel No. 12, suggesting that it was a finer beverage than Jack Daniel’s Old No. 7.  I wouldn’t have known the difference at the time, so I took him at his word.  The first sip went down like a razor blade, but after that my taste for alcohol was a whisky taste—George Dickel No. 12 in particular.  Then, I made it my mission to educate my college roommate—God rest his soul—in the same tradition. He did me proud. I’ve tried to uphold that tradition ever since.  George Dickle no. 12 is certainly a fine beverage, and...